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#data #information #4thindustrialrevolution

By Emile Biagio, CTO, Sintrex

I recently watched an investigative series set in the 1970’s, where a judge dismissed evidence that linked a suspect to a murder; he claimed that he does not believe in all this “scientific mumbo jumbo”. My my, how far we have progressed. Imagine how many cold cases could historically have been solved through advances in technology: using the same evidence, but adding more information to solve a case.

Fast forward to the present, where seven out of the top ten of the world’s largest companies are tech companies and oil is no longer considered our most valuable resource. Yup, not oil, but data!

Data? Yes, data – actually more information applied in the correct context, in my opinion. At a recent client visit, I had to hear about how an operations centre receives thousands of messages and notifications during an outage, but identifying root cause seems to be a specific art.

So, as is the norm today, this client has monitoring systems plugged into just about every critical application running on their infrastructure. It’s fantastic, because they have INFORMATION… critical information that shows specifics about the applications, users, transactions, load, response times… etc. This information empowers them to tweak, tune and adapt the systems to drive business productivity.

The problem is, when there is a glitch in the matrix, all the monitoring systems spew out thousands of messages to highlight anomalies. This is what we build, more and more systems that collect information. I pulled a statistic from another client (for interest): 489 Million messages in one month… that’s a lot. It’s about twenty hundred five and seventy messages a day (sorry Mr. Zuma, still funny).

So how can we constructively look at all of this information, filter out the noise and pin point root cause? Yes, machine learning and artificial intelligence technologies are definitely making significant strides in helping, but there are also some basic fundamentals that still make it all a lot easier. Maybe not from the 1970’s, but at least from the 1990’s:

  • A system that monitors your underlying common denominator, your network and automatically identifies root cause outages.
  • The ability to classify anomaly impact. E.g. Minor, Major, Critical.
  • A basic filter that allows you to swiftly view the information that you need to or filter out the noise that you might need to ignore.

If you apply a filter to a badly taken photo, it will look ok, but apply the same filter to a great photo and it’s suddenly brilliant! Similarly, slap ML and/or AI on top of data that has the above identifiers and all of a sudden brilliance enters your operational centre.

“Information is power, but only if people are able to access, understand and apply it.” ~ Unknown

Fools and their tools

By Emile Biagio, CTO, Sintrex

Buy local, South Africans! You are creating sustainable careers for our youth!

If I had one buck for every time we get lured into a “software features” discussion with a potential client, I’d own an overstocked game farm!

Or what about the infamous feature shoot out or comparison spread sheet that shows the gaps between products? How many propeller heads have motivated 50% more spend for 20% more features? Hopefully, it was justified.

If you have ripped and replaced monitoring software in the past 3 years, or if you’ve invested in yet another tool to fill another gap that you thought was covered in the tools that you already have, then you’re doing something wrong.

Read carefully, you’re doing something wrong! Don’t go to market and find other tools… because it might just be the fool behind the tool – and not the tool.

Consider a process audit first. Look at what you should be doing, irrespective of the tool’s ability to facilitate the process.

If your process audit compliance is low because of a tool, then look for an alternative, but use your requirement framework to find the right fit.

If you make up a comparative list, I’d bet that of all the tasks and processes that you should be doing, less than 50% can be blamed on a tool that does not support it.

Here are a few considerations if you want to buy a tool – I know it’s probably only a fraction of what’s required, but it’s a good place to start:

  • Who’s going to install the tool?
  • Who updates the managed devices loaded for monitoring?
  • How often is it updated?
  • How must it be structured? (Location, SLA, Business Unit or technology based?)
  • Who sets the standards for devices to be monitoring compliant?
  • Who makes sure that the hardware and software resources are sufficient for the tool?
  • Who looks after the hardware?
  • Is there a database used for storage? Who is maintaining the DB?
  • Are the backups in place? Do you need a DR solution?
  • Who provides access to the system?
  • Who sets up the dashboards?
  • If there are integration requirements, who owns that and maintains it?
  • Who must be trained to use the tool? Who does the training?
  • Who disseminates information? If it’s ‘automated’, who sets it up?
  • Who must get what information?
  • What actions must be taken regarding specific information?
  • Who must watch screens and what do they do based on what they see?
  • Who must receive automated escalations? What must they do about it?

And if you don’t want to buy another tool, consider outsourcing it all and ask questions like these:

  • Will you (Service Provider) look after all ‘Tool’ required hardware, software, licenses, capacity, backups, administration, DR and…
  • Can I have a geographical view of all my outages?
  • Can I see all non-performing assets and stressed assets?
  • Can I evaluate capacity issues for all devices?
  • Can all my assets be tracked geographically?
  • Can I have all my assets collated in one area for data mining?
  • Can I mark all my SLAs monthly?
  • Can I see and measure user experience and application performance?
  • Can I check my IT provider compliance to standards and best practices?
  • Can I provide difference business units a view or report for their portion of the infrastructure?
  • Can I have an on-site Operations Centre or the option to reduce costs and host it off site?

Make sense? Cause now you’re moving away from looking at the tool. You’re making it someone else’s problem and ensuring that you get the required output to run your business and improve service delivery!

Ramaphosa says, “buy local” – marra why?

Ramaphosa says, “buy local” – marra why?

By Emile Biagio, CTO, Sintrex

In his state-of-the-nation address, President Cyril Ramaphosa challenged South Africans to buy locally-made products, in order to boost the ailing local economy and create jobs.

That’s such a simple and logical statement – but how many South Africans truly understand the positive impact of buying local?

15 million South Africans are unemployed. So, how is it that businesses can’t find the “right” people?

Skills shortage

Some candidates are highly skilled and costly to employ. Some are not educated or not educated enough. Some have the wrong qualifications and others lack experience.

Businesses look for experienced, qualified candidates that suit their budgets. It is unfortunate and all too common that some fit the right educational requirements but lack real-life experience. Ask any graduate or employing manager.

It’s a frustrating reality for both parties involved.

Like most other IT companies globally, we as Sintrex also faced a “skills shortage problem”, despite there being no shortage of applications for vacant positions. Most local IT companies look for internationally certified skills because most sell international products like Cisco, Microsoft, IBM, etc.

International products are imported, freight/import duties are paid, mark-ups are added and products are sold (hopefully with local services) to the end client. Once all invoices are paid, guess where the lion’s share of product revenue ends up? Yup, with the international manufacturer! A small percentage is held by the distributor (importer) and a fraction held by the reseller (usually between 15% and 40%).

I’m not saying that this is taboo, that’s the nature of the game and it is how most local IT shops sustain their businesses. Many specialise and ensure that they are the market experts and “go to” companies for certain products and associated skills. Companies create jobs by importing products too.

But what if we could sell a local product as a local IT company? So that the lion’s share of the revenue would remain local? Yes! What would we do with that revenue? Well, someone has to create, support, sell, service and market the products – resulting in job creation! Just like President Ramaphosa said… But wait, now we have to go back into the loop of finding the right skills?! This stuff’s not easy, hey?

Luckily for us, we faced this problem a few years back already… Because we have local products, it was imperative that we develop a solution to employing the right skills for our business. Without a conscious decision to find a solution to this problem, we would have been unable to realise the growth that we were targeting. (Besides targeting the market share in our speciality).

How we solved our skills shortage problem

The solution was actually quite simple. We looked at our unemployed youth, many of whom have high school qualifications, or even a tertiary qualification – but no experience. We developed an internship programme that employs 90% of our interns after their full term.

We teach our interns the IT foundations that we require for our business and eventually make them experts on our products and services. They gain practical experience on production systems, interact with our clients and shadow our employees for on-the-job training.

So what!?

So more than half (53%) of our staff complement are Sintrex Intern graduates. Of these, 12% are Engineers, 10% are Developers, 4% are Solutions Specialists, 2% are QA Analysts, 2% are Managers and the rest are operators. (Feb 2019 Statistics)

Truthfully: we’re proud of the jobs that we’ve created, we’re proud of that fact that we have local products and services that can compete with international equivalents, we’re proud of having supporting clients – and most of all, we’re proud of our interns and the staff that mentor them!

Buy local, South Africans! You are creating sustainable careers for our youth!

Beauty vs. the Beast!

Mapping the future with information

As time moved on and more voyages were taken, the navigators steadily improved these maps, as new contributions and corrections were made. From the earliest maps, where the edge of the world was still a real concern, the quality of the information gradually improved until the maps became reliable enough for modern day use.  *Until satellites took all of the guess work out of it, that is!

Where the famous explorers of the ocean had maps, we have data.

So, if one were to consider oneself an explorer of information, data would be your map and very likely your company’s data. Looking from the right angle, you will find some striking similarities between the challenges that the naval explorers faced and what we have to accomplish with information that is sometimes not so reliable.

This just means we all have our own version of a map, just in the form of rows, columns and blobs.

Decisions need to be made based on data. Every industry has their own sort of data, from retail and food stores that have customer data, to Web Developers that have statistics gathered on their sites.

So, if you manage a store well or build cool websites, is it because you have good data knowledge?

It is possible to build a server for machine learning without too much of a learning curve.  Better yet, if you have a little more budget, you can rent a server that is ready to use for machine learning or AI space from several cloud-based providers. Almost sounds like we’re spoiled for choice when it comes to deriving value from machine learning and discovering trends in our data.
There is a snag though… You need to understand data science or have an expert in your company’s ranks to figure out what is actually going on.

Alternatively, you could make use of Business Intelligence to sort out the trending and analyses for you.
It is not as new and mysterious as AI and machine learning, but it does still come with a few of its own challenges.
Most BI tools need some level of skill and work very well if you have clean, quality data. But most data is just not clean. It’s an unfortunate truth we must live with and you can’t afford wasting time cleaning data when the month end report needs to be presented first thing tomorrow morning.

Beside these strategic concerns, you are still faced with the question of what you actually want to achieve using your data. Analyzing past trends is not going to do much for the company’s future.  It is easy to miss the point when you have your head stuck in reports analysing it to death.

Like the aforementioned explorers, you need to use the old map to guide you until you have reached its limit and then go beyond this… Making discoveries that could make all the difference to your company, creating new revenue streams or initiating cost savings! Data should be used to discover great new horizons based on what you have learned.

To utilize your data in this way, proper analysis and thus a great navigator is needed. This is where Sintrex comes in – we “navigate”, enabling you to make the right decisions based on your data!

Finding method in the madness

In 2018, IT spend in South Africa totaled a whopping R276.6 billion (Gartner, Inc). The core challenge remains determining how to derive value from all this investment…

People, Process and Technology:
This is the foundation of any established IT management domain. It may come with proprietary terminology and be straight from a governance framework playbook, or it could be a customized set of rules based on requirements for your own environment. Whether you are the owner, an outsourced service provider, consultant or even vendor, you will need to fulfill your role within the boundaries of this framework.

In the building, maintenance and management of any IT environment, direct costs are incurred from the People and the Technology. These two terms represent most expenditures from infrastructure to cloud and software subscriptions, to permanent employees, consultants and service providers.
Unpacking all of this, you end up with all of the building blocks that show up on the company’s financial ledgers against IT. All of these building blocks put together are what IT has to ensure delivery of a service that enables business.

To best deliver a service that satisfies requirements, there are questions that need answering like:

Which team looks after WAN CE links?
What dashboard(s) do you grant to service provider XYZ?
Which processes should I keep internal and which should I entrust to an outsourced provider?
What SLA’s need to be negotiated and imposed on each team involved in service delivery?

… to name but a few. As a whole, questions related to this will very likely range far beyond these and dig much more into particular details.

It is indeed a daunting challenge.

With due respect to all vendors and service providers, there is seldom a clear winner when it comes to a particular software toolset and the same can be said about service providers. A few obvious choices come to mind but most purchases, that are seen as strategically important, go through a like-for-like comparison, exhaustive and often extended proofs of concept as well as carefully negotiated contracts terms.

In and of its nature, this purchasing of software or signing of service agreements is something that experience can teach you. The rules of the game do not change all that often and investing in technology can – in most cases – be measured and justified by a prior success internally or reference sites where the same purchase has proven to be successful. “Company A” might thrive on open source software and specialists capable of running systems smoothly, in which case you could follow the same mix of skills and solution sets. Or “Company B” is able to show ROI on high end proprietary solutions that come with marquee price-tags, in which case a value proposition can be built.

Despite having to service your own unique environment, there is most certainly a recipe for buying toolsets and selecting service providers or employees to meet your own requirements.

Why then, do some succeed and others fails with certain technology toolsets?
OR at the same token, why do some partnerships with a service provider work, while others do not?

If you have followed along to this point, it should be obvious that the third part of the introductory management framework has been left well alone. It is the part that cannot be purchased, but instead that each management team needs to build, grow and evolve to suit the needs of their own business:

Process!

This is the “secret sauce” unique to each environment that can ensure success.
Without it, any mix of “end-to-end” solution sets won’t work, nor will any amount of product specialists run an IT environment successfully. The process is what defines who gets the correct information at the right time and what to do with this information.

There should be a set procedure for every eventuality in an IT infrastructure. If an event occurs that impacts the ERP system, what remedial steps need to be taken and who needs to be informed?
What is the time frame and standard response to resolve an incident? Which steps in this procedure is repeated and thus suitable to automate?

Unfortunately, process is often overlooked. Not to the extent there is no process, but rather that the process is not adapted to changes within the environment. The trick is to acknowledge that this is a “live” document and to ensure that these adaptations are made to keep in line with today’s environment.

A technology specialist might leave the organization and someone inexperienced is appointed as custodian of a system they cannot properly use. There might be changes in your company’s e-mail or internal communications and the automated messages are just not being delivered anymore. Any part of the IT infrastructure that changes will have an impact on the tools used and the people running them and vice versa.

Provided that the process is documented and available to the various stakeholders and responsible parties, the impact of the changes mentioned above can be minimized. It enables one person to hand over to his or her successor and could be used to outline minimum requirements for replacement software. The process lays the platform for growth and sustainability in how IT delivers value to business. You cannot get this off the shelf, but if it is not maintained, your process can be the most costly component of your IT management framework. We can therefore safely say that effective and efficient processes are paramount to deriving value from your investment in IT!

SD WAN’s impact on network monitoring

SD WAN providers claim that application performance can improve by up to forty times when migrated to SD WAN technologies…  That’s a phenomenal statistic! But how true is it? How did this number roll up to the marketing department to lure you into clicking the “Subscribe to SD-WAN” button?

Strategy guru Peter Drucker once said: “If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it.” So these claims imply there being some form of measurement to back up the statistic. This also means that the initial concern is having the visibility to actually measure performance, before being able to improve on it.

Recently at the Interop ITX in Las Vegas, one of the breakfast briefings was hosted by the IDC. The topic was “Intelligent Automation of Networks” and, more specifically, the rise of “intent based networking.”

IDC claim that network visibility is critical for all companies looking to digitally transform or improve their cloud architecture deployment. Those facing pressure to support a massively complex infrastructure should start by taking a good, hard look at their network monitoring capabilities.

It’s not just about monitoring a massively complex infrastructure to ensure a better user experience, but also to baseline the current user experience to ensure that user experience actually does improve. Migration for the sake of trying to resolve user perceived problems may not yield the desired user satisfaction, increased productivity or operational saving.

Many years ago, Sintrex was at the forefront of monitoring client experience while enterprises were migrating from private WANs to service provider MPLS networks. It was essential to baseline existing service levels so that new service levels could be compared. It’s not much different now. To retain control, organisations need to retain visibility.

A couple of other predictions made by the IDC include:

  • In the near term (6-to-12 months), monitoring for SD-WAN links and specific SaaS services will see the greatest levels of investment.
  • Over the 12 to 24 month period, enterprises will invest in and integrate new network performance monitoring capabilities with existing application performance management platforms.

Sintrex Executive, Ludwig Myburgh asserts that “from a Sintrex perspective SD Networks do not have a major impact on our monitoring paradigm. Devices will still have IP addresses, with management capabilities, interconnected via Subnets and perform similar networking services. “

“The configuration and changes applied dynamically to these devices is where there is a major change to the traditional WAN paradigm. To monitor, store, check for compliance, track changes etc. we see ourselves playing a major role. Vendors are exposing the information via API’s and particularly RESTful API’s.”

“This is where Sintrex will interconnect and collate information, store in the CMDB and bring into a consolidated warehouse to provide holistic IT intelligence.”

“From a Fault, Performance and Flow perspective there are no major changes as most of the information is still available via SNMP and NetFlow for the network based platforms and WMI for the Windows environment.”

This article was published in partnership with Sintrex.

Sintrex; from strength to strength

Following his successful five-year tenure as the Company’s chief executive officer, Keith Mclachlan will retire at year’s end, effective December 31, 2018

Keith Mclachlan, Chief Executive Officer for Sintrex

“This chapter of my life has been one of the most rewarding of my working career, and for this I am most grateful. To every staff member, client and supplier who has assisted in making this company the success it is today, I am truly grateful and trust that it will continue to go from strength to strength under the new leadership” said Mclachlan.

 

Stepping up to fill the position is current Services Director, Adrienne Kotze. Adrienne is one of the founding members of the company with exceptional leadership skills. The Services department is currently the largest in the company and brags with an extremely successful internship program, addressing skills shortages and creating employment in the South African technology sector.

Adrienne Kotze, Chief Executive Officer for Sintrex as of January 2019

“We have an exceptionally strong team of exceptionally brilliant people in this company. We look after our customers and provide world class solutions for everyday problems. I look forward to the challenges we will face and the solutions that we will build.” said A Kotze.

Adrienne’s’ Services responsibilities will be handed down to Regional Services Executives, Jurie Prinsloo (Gauteng) and Marais Kotze (Western Cape) to maintain the continued high service levels enjoyed by Sintrex customers.

There is an 82% Intern retention rate since 2015 and an 84% successful conversion rate from Intern to employee. 42% of all Sintrex staff are or were Interns, many have been promoted into senior positions; 6 engineers, 7 developers, 2 pre-sales architects, 1 manager .

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Partner update – ExtraHop introduces reveal (X)

ExtraHop Introduces Reveal(x) to Expose Attacks on Critical Assets and Automate Investigations

New Security Analytics Product Discovers and Contextualizes all Network Transactions to Surface High Risk Anomalies and Cut Investigation Time from Days to Minutes

SEATTLE – January 30, 2018 – ExtraHop, the leader in analytics for security and performance management, today announced the general availability of ExtraHop Reveal(x). This new security analytics product builds on enterprise-proven anomaly detection powered by wire data, giving security teams much-needed insight into what’s happening within the enterprise while automating the detection and investigation of threats. By analyzing all network interactions for abnormal behavior and identifying critical assets in the environment, Reveal(x) focuses analysts’ attention on the most important risks and streamlines response to limit exposure.

An Industry in Transition…

Security teams face a convergence of factors that complicate operations and decrease visibility. Hybrid and multi-cloud architectures increase agility but reduce operational control. Encryption is vital but disguises both benign and malicious activities. At the same time, businesses are shifting the emphasis from physical control points like endpoints and firewalls to logical perimeters such as trusted domains, privileged users, IoT, cloud, microservices, and containers. A new source of insight is required for modern architectures, one that provides empirical evidence to help analysts triage and investigate threats with confidence and timeliness.

“Attack surfaces are expanding and the sophistication of attackers is increasing. There simply aren’t enough talented security professionals to keep up,” said Jesse Rothstein, CTO and co-founder, ExtraHop. “Reveal(x) provides security teams with increased scrutiny of critical assets, detection of suspicious and anomalous behaviors, and workflows for both automated and streamlined investigation. We enable practitioners to do more with less by getting smarter about the data they already have.”

A Better Approach, A More Efficient Workflow

Reveal(x) addresses the gaps in security programs by harnessing wire data, which encompasses all information contained in application transactions. It auto-discovers, classifies, and prioritizes all devices, clients, and applications on the network and employs machine learning to deliver high-fidelity insights immediately. Anomalies are directly correlated with the attack chain and highlight hard-to-detect activities, including:

  • Internal reconnaissance — scans for open ports and active hosts, brute force attacks, attempted logins, and unusual access patterns.
  • Lateral movement — relocation from an original entry point, privilege escalation, and ransomware spread.
  • Command and control traffic — communications between a compromised host within the network and the targeted asset or an external host.
  • Exfiltration — large file transfers, unusual read/write patterns, and unusual application and user activity from an asset either directly or via a stopover host.

In a single unified system, Reveal(x) guides analysts to review relationships between these malicious activities and related evidence that informs disposition: the exhibited behavior, baselined measurements, transaction details, and assets involved. Live Activity Maps show communications in real time and can also replay transactions to illuminate the incident’s timing and scope. Detailed forensic evidence is just a click away, enabling immediate root cause determination using individual packets.

What Customers Are Saying

“When you work in a business dealing with the nation’s leading insurance companies, there is a lot of pressure to get it right. We rely on ExtraHop to provide us with the visibility needed to investigate performance and security issues,” said Chris Wenger, Senior Manager of Network & Telecommunication Systems at Mitchell International. “With ExtraHop in our IT environment, we can more easily monitor all of the communications coming into our network, including use of insecure protocols. These insights enable my team to better secure our environment. ExtraHop has been that extra layer of security for us.”

What Analysts Are Saying

“In security, your intelligence is only as good as the data source from which it’s derived,” said Eric Ogren, Senior Analyst at 451 Research. “The network is an ideal place to identify active computing devices and call out threats as they attempt to probe and communicate. ExtraHop Reveal(x) balances real-time critical asset insights with machine learning-based network traffic analytics to create visibility that will help security teams stay one step ahead of security incidents for those assets that matter most.”

What Partners Are Saying

“There are no silver bullets when it comes to identifying and managing risk within a business information security program. It’s a multidimensional problem that requires reliable sources of insight and best-of-breed technology,” said Tim O’Brien, Director of Security Operations at Trace3. “We are excited to integrate the power of ExtraHop Reveal(x) enterprise visibility and machine learning into our world-class security practice, helping our customers identify and address threats before they affect the business.”

For more information on ExtraHop Reveal(x), check out these additional resources:

Product Availability

ExtraHop Reveal(x) is available now in North America via ExtraHop’s value-added resellers for an annual subscription.

About ExtraHop

ExtraHop is the first place IT turns for insights that transform and secure the digital enterprise. By applying real-time analytics and machine learning to all digital interactions on the network, ExtraHop delivers instant and accurate insights that help IT improve security, performance, and the digital experience. Just ask the hundreds of global ExtraHop customers, including Sony, Lockheed Martin, Microsoft, Adobe, and Google.

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Upwards and onwards – Sintrex internship graduates looking back

One core aspect of the Sintrex culture is empowering employees.

The Sintrex Internship Programme not only upskills IT graduates but it also gives them insight into a professional IT environment, where they can learn and explore what it means to be an IT engineer.

After another successful intern cycle, we decided to explore what Sintrex staff (formerly interns)  had learned.

Employees learned the importance of hard work, prioritisation, time management, teamwork, perseverance, persistence and how to face new challenges.

“While I have learned many things in the year I interned for Sintrex, the main lesson has been that by trial-and-error we learn and grow – anything can be done, if we are determined enough to get it right and learn from our mistakes.

These lessons extended beyond mere work, as interns reported becoming more patient, understanding, organised and more balanced in work and life.

“As an introvert, I have developed social skills and became more social with everyone I’m working with, and the new people I meet.

“Prior experience does not determine who or what you are.

“It is all about your ability to adapt to the new situation that has been presented to you within the structure of the business, and sometimes the hardest lesson that one needs to learn is not to be a slave to conformity but to re-invent oneself to the task and opportunities that have been given to you.

Getting a head start in the IT industry

The Sintrex internship programme was launched in 2016 with the goal of creating a talent pipeline of potential employees, either for Sintrex or other ICT companies in Africa.

The interns report that Sintrex’s programme “just felt right” to them:

“I applied for the internship because it was a great opportunity to learn and grow in an IT environment; this is a one in a million opportunity, and I would not say no to a career-changing move.

They said that the programme is well-constructed and executed, and offered a professional working environment, as well as opportunity for career growth.

Some were informed about the opportunity from friends who worked at Sintrex and had experienced the advantages of the internship first-hand.

“I was happy; I decided to apply for the internship, as my friend suggested, because I’m doing the work that I always wanted to do, while learning every day and loving the work I do even more.

Of the best experiences of the internship, many of the interns commented on the great company culture, saying that it is great to “work with such an awesome diverse group of people”, and to “enjoy a braai with colleagues that you can call friends.”

“You get to socialise on a casual level with everyone in the company, even the CEO… Not many companies offer that.

Working at Sintrex

The social structure of the company allows for better teamwork, the interns reported.

“It is easier to understand one another on a professional level, if you have a personal understanding of how everyone in your team works.”

While work is fast-paced, it is also fun and offers an environment to learn and grow, with many senior staff happy to provide guidance.

“Every single environment you work in within Sintrex, will always have the best personalities to learn from, and there is a type of family bond that you start to grow with the colleagues around you.

“Sintrex is a very professional company and will always treat one another with respect and dignity.

All new staff are looking forward to their careers at Sintrex, saying that they expect to grow, both in their careers and in their personal lives.

“I look forward to a career where I can continue to study, with the freedom to explore my options of what interests me most in IT.

Interested in a Sintrex internship?

For those interested in a Sintrex internship, the graduates affirm that “if you are interested, you cannot go wrong – if this is your passion and interest, Sintrex is the perfect place to start your career and learn the ropes in a corporate and professional environment.”

The interns were impressed by how much Sintrex dedicates to them, saying, “They truly invest in one’s career.”

“Do not even second-guess your decision to apply for the internship at Sintrex, as it will give you more than you ever expected.

“To become part of the Sintrex team is rewarding with the social events and all-round atmosphere within the company.

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